My Omakase Moriawase Experience in Toronto

Something I’ve been working on as part of my slow living ideals is slowing down my meals and being more mindful of the overall eating experience. So this year, I decided to bring my mom to an upscale Japanese restaurant in Toronto to celebrate her birthday and early Mother’s Day. Seafood is one of our favourite foods of all time, and if you’re like us, I would totally recommend this experience to you!

Moriawase (盛り合わせ) translated directly from Japanese, means an assorted platter of sushi or sashimi. Per the restaurant’s description, this platter would feature items recommended by the chef, or whatever fish is fresh that day. I’m sure a lot of restaurants in Toronto offer the omakase experience as well, but I chose this restaurant because a lot of my friends recommended it and I read somewhere that a lot of their ingredients are imported from Japan. Details at the end of the post.

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The first thing we actually ordered was the o-toro, which is a highly-prized fatty underbelly meat of the bluefin tuna. This was ordered separately… but it was toro so we just couldn’t help it! From the picture, you can see the even fat distribution, which is what contributes to the buttery, melt-in-your-mouth texture and the iconic umami taste. It’s so soft it even looks like it’s falling apart!

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Our omakase moriawase experience started with a miso soup and an appetizer. The soup was a really good combination of the salty and savoury taste of miso with a fresh and sweet note of clams. The appetizer is a salad of avocado (mashed into something like guacamole) mixed with bamboo shoot.

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Our sashimi platter came first, which included akami tuna, o-toro tuna, amberjack, uni, octopus, yellowtail, and scallop.

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The toro was the best!

My favourite was obviously the o-toro, but I also loved the uni and the scallop. The uni was rich and creamy, very sweet and a little bit nutty. The scallop was delicately smooth and sweet. The akami tuna (the regular, red one) had a milder taste and a rougher texture, but was still good. The amberjack had a good firm texture to it with a note of sweetness. The yellowtail was light and meaty with a hint of salt. The octopus was also meaty, bordering on a rubbery texture, and had a hint of salt water.

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On our nigiri platter, we had akami tuna, salmon, salmon harasu, kurodai, amberjack, yellowtail, crab, and amaebi.

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My favourite was the amaebi due to its sweet and fresh taste, and it also had a meaty texture. Salmon harasu is the salmon version of the toro from tuna, and it had a very buttery and a strong salmon taste. I also really liked the kurodai, which was very fleshy. The crab was also really good, which was fresh and had a salt water taste – I was also happy to see real crab instead of the imitation crab that I usually get at more affordable places.

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No meal is complete without dessert

We finished our experience with the sake cheesecake, which we really enjoyed. This was also ordered separately, but it was a good dessert to end our meal with. It had a rich and creamy texture, with  a surprisingly strong sake taste that went really well with the cream cheese taste. It was also garnished with sake jello, and a bunch of berries. As a seldom drinker liked that, even though the sake taste was strong, it didn’t have that dry taste and the berries really spiced it up.

Location: Yuzu No Hana 
236 Adelaide Street W
Toronto
ON M5H 1W7

I would say this experience was an extremely enjoyable. I was able to try a lot of good quality fish, some of which I’ve never even tried before. This omakase moriawase really sets the bar high for my future sushi meals though!

Apart from the good food, I was also glad that we were able to take 2 hours out of our busy schedules to have some mother-and-daughter bonding time. How often do we actually focus on the taste and quality of our food? Have meaningful conversations with our family? Sometimes we just need to slow down enough to enjoy our life.

Who would you bring to enjoy this gastronomic experience with you?

What to do in Toronto: Soar High

Do you get excited at the idea of free falling? You’re not alone, humans have always been interested in flying. Like how Daedalus and Icarus strapped wings to themselves and took off, or how the Wright brothers built a plane. Do you ever wonder why humans have always been so interested in flying?

For many, flying has also been an epitome of freedom. So, being the curious adventurer that I am, I’ve always wanted to try it at least once. I may not have enough money to spare for an actual skydiving experience, yet, but I got a pretty close alternative.

And if you’re searching for exciting things to do in Toronto, like me, you should definitely check this place out.

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Indoor skydiving is all the rage right now, and I got to try this experience out at iFly Toronto (they have one in Oakville and one in Whitby). Tip: You have to make reservations.

When we arrived, we checked in with the reception, where we confirmed our information, signed a waiver (that we understand all the risks of the activity), and then got weighed. Tip: The weight limit is 230 lbs.

Then, the staff directed up upstairs, where we saw people floating around in the wind tunnel (an instructor and a guest), and the observation deck lined with chairs for visitors to sit in. The staff told us we were group 19, and left us there to wait for our turn.

We watched people take turns going inside and the instructors showing off their skills inside the wind tunnel. We got a little worried because there were no staff in the waiting area and we were worried we missed our group. But about 20 minutes later, the instructor finally came out and called our group.

We were a small group of 7 people, and he led us into a demonstration room where we watched a introductory video. After the video, the instructor returned and reviewed the basic concepts – the hand gestures he will be using to communicate with us in the wind tunnel, and the basic posture and how to get in and out of the tunnel.

After we were adequately prepared, we headed back out to get our suit and equipment on. This basically included a flight suit, a helmet, goggles, and ear plugs. They provided lockers to put our belongings. Tip: Remember to wear athletic clothing and running shoes, as you will be wearing them during the skydiving – don’t wear anything that might fall off your body!

Once we were ready, we lined up to go into the chamber, sitting on the bench inside, waiting for our turn. They offer different packages that includes 2 flights, 4 flights, or more per person. We got the 2 flights option. Each flight is only 1 minute. It may not seem like a lot, but it’s pretty close to the amount of free fall you would get in a real skydiving experience anyways.

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It took some time to get my balance the first time I went in, but I got a hang of it eventually. The key is to stay calm and stay in position even if you are falling. The instructor will help you, just remember to breath..

Though, it may be a better experience for more petite or shorter people like me. I enjoyed my free fall and had lots of fun flying up and down the tunnel. My boyfriend on the other hand is 6’3″ (a whole foot taller than me) and the instructor had a much more difficult time trying to hold on to him. He got a cut on his hand from falling on the metal net at the bottom of the tunnel and was not as thrilled as I was. In the end, we both agreed that it was a unique experience though – definitely not something you can do everyday.

Perhaps, the reason we are so interested is simply because we can’t.

Well, here’s another thing crossed off my bucket list. Follow me for updates on my adventures!

Jump, and you will find out how to unfold your wings as you fall.